PUMPHOUSE POINT, TASMANIA, AUSTRALIA

Pumphouse Point Exterior, photo via hotel
Pumphouse Point bridge, photo via hotel
Pumphouse Point sitting room, photo via hotel
Pumphouse Point historic photo as a pumphouse, photo via hotel
Kangaroo crossing Tasmania
Pumphouse Point in-room pantry, photo via hotel
Echidna crossing Tasmania
Pumphouse Point entrance in winter, photo via hotel
Wombat crossing Tasmania
Pumphouse Point old photo of construction, photo via hotel
Pumphouse Point Exterior, photo via hotel
Pumphouse Point bridge, photo via hotel
Pumphouse Point sitting room, photo via hotel
Pumphouse Point historic photo as a pumphouse, photo via hotel
Kangaroo crossing Tasmania
Pumphouse Point in-room pantry, photo via hotel
Echidna crossing Tasmania
Pumphouse Point entrance in winter, photo via hotel
Wombat crossing Tasmania
Pumphouse Point old photo of construction, photo via hotel

why stay here? 

●     The idyllic location in the Tasmanian wilderness on Lake St. Clair

●      The delight of staying in a converted old pumphouse

●      The prospect of coming upon wombats, echidnas, and platypuses in the vicinity

feel & design

Pumphouse Point is comprised of industrial buildings that have been transformed into a lovely retreat in the middle of Tasmania on the banks of the deep and clear Lake St. Clair. Cumulus Studios, which handled the restoration, have taken great care to preserve the exterior to respect the site’s heritage. By design, nothing overwhelms in order to let the natural setting do the showing off. And that it does, in spades, with the crisp clear air, the surrounding eucalypt, myrtle, and temperate rainforests, the pristine waters of the lake and nearby rivers, and the calm that so much pure nature around inevitably and pleasingly brings.

 

rooms

The pumphouse, which is accessible via a long visually arresting bridge, has 12 rooms. The whole effect is that of being on a tiny island, as the building juts out into the lake. It has a cosy sitting area, complete with a fireplace, a well-stocked honesty bar, blankets for chilly evenings, and backgammon sets. The shore house, with six rooms, has beautiful views of the lake and the pumphouse itself. The interior decor is subtle and functional, in keeping with the intent to let the location speak for itself. A new addition to the property, The Retreat, is available for bookings from December 2017, and promises to go above and beyond the other rooms to provide a particularly special experience.

 

food

The hotel offers a shared-table dinner experience if you intend to eat at their restaurant. Let them know in advance what you generally do and don’t eat because the menu is simple and limited. The dishes are hearty and plentiful, hit the spot after a day of being outdoors, but the food itself isn’t particularly memorable. Catching snippets of chitchat with people at the communal tables is entertaining but leaves little room for privacy, so if that’s what you’re after, we suggest retreating to your room and making the best of your nicely stocked little personal larder, which does not disappoint. Cured meats, cheese, salmon, various spreads, and the ability to request freshly baked loaves of bread to your room means that you can put together a lovely picnic for yourself.  The honesty bar in the pumphouse sitting area, and the items in your larder, are all made available at retail prices, a refreshing touch.

 

facilities

●      Beautiful walking trails in the (more or less tame) wilderness

●      A restaurant

●      Dinghies and bicycles for use

●      A small library

 

service

Affable and casual.

 

what's nearby?

Lake St. Clair has hundreds of kilometers of unspoiled walking trails around it. Choose your path and take it all in. The famous Overland Track passes nearby as well, for those who want more strenuous pursuits. We chose the Playpus Bay walk one day, revelled in the deliciously clean air and loved it, but unfortunately failed to see the many playing platypuses that are often seen.

 

how do you get here? 

Drive 2.5 hours from Hobart past myriad wombat and echidna crossing signs, deeper and deeper into Tasmania. Helicopter transfers are available.

Please note that the photos of the hotel have been provided by the hotel and are taken by photographer Adam Gibson.